September 21, 2019  
 
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Selling a Seat Belts Business

Economic uncertainty influences the timing of many seat belts business sales. But based on what we're seeing in the business-for-sale marketplace, we don't think economic conditions should deter you from putting your seat belts business on the market.

Business sellers are notorious for second-guessing themselves about the right time to put their companies up for sale.
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Undaunted by economic conditions, many seat belts business sellers are achieving their sale goals through deliberate sale strategies.

Current Market Conditions

No one plans to sell a seat belts business in a down economy. So far, government intervention and promises that the economy is slowly recovering haven't been enough to alleviate many entrepreneur's fears. Despite the risks, sellers need to be cognizant of the fact that there is a large volume of seat belts businesses waiting to be listed until the economy rebounds. When that happens, the buyers' market will become even stronger and have a negative impact on prices. So what's our point? The economy isn't the most important factor in the sale of your business. Instead, you should be focusing on making your seat belts business as attractive as possible so to buyers right now.

Turning the Tables: Buyer Concessions

In a tight economy, seller concessions are the name of the game. But that doesn't mean you can't push for buyer concessions to achieve a more favorable outcome in the sale of your seat belts business. Often, buyer concessions represent financial incentives that the seller receives in exchange for providing a non-cash benefit (e.g. training, financing, etc.. Asset exclusions, retained ownership shares and long-term contracts with another of the seller's companies can also be leveraged to extract concessions from buyers.

Working with Accountants

Accountants lay the financial groundwork for a business sale. Most seat belts business have significant tax consequences requiring the input of a qualified accountant. A professional audit can ease buyer concerns and amp up the value of your financial presentation. In certain instances, it may be appropriate to ask your accountant to vet the financials of prospective buyers, run credit checks or even structure the terms of a seller-financed deal.

More Exit Planning Articles

We think you may find these additional resources to be of interest.

Selling Part of a Business

Marketing a Seat Belts Business

Five Tips for Maximizing Your Business Sale Price


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