February 18, 2020  
 
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Selling a Beer and Ale Retail Business

Don't believe anyone who tells you it's easy to sell a beer and ale retail business. A lot of things need to happen before you can successfully exit your business. But with a few tips, you can keep your shirt and your sanity in the sale of your business.

Business sellers sometimes face a long, hard struggle to get fair market value for their companies. But with the adequate preparation, your beer and ale retail business can attract buyers who recognize its potential.
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However, serious buyers also understand the value of a good beer and ale retail business. So for beer and ale retail business sellers, today's market is all about convincing buyers that the numbers make their companies worth the asking price.

Selling Time

From the day they decide to sell their company, the question that plagues many owners is how long it will take to sell their beer and ale retail business. Although asking price and other factors contribute to sale time, it's difficult to predict how long your business will be on the market before you locate the right buyer. Before you can list your beer and ale retail business, you'll need to invest as much as a year in preparing it for prospective buyers. Even though it's conceivable that an attractive opportunity could sell in weeks, an immediate flood of offers could indicate that the business is underpriced.

How to Choose a Business Broker

Good business brokers inevitably produce better business sales. In the beer and ale retail business industry, experience is a must-have characteristic for qualified brokerage. The chemistry you have with your broker is a consideration. If you don't connect with a specific broker, move on to someone else - even if the first broker looks great on paper.

Buyer Concessions

Sellers aren't the only ones who can make concessions in a business sale. In many instances, sellers can request buyer concessions. Often, buyer concessions represent financial incentives that the seller receives in exchange for providing a non-cash benefit (e.g. training, financing, etc.. Asset exclusions, retained ownership shares and long-term contracts with another of the seller's companies can also be leveraged to extract concessions from buyers.

More Exit Planning Articles

Ready to learn more? You may find these additional resources to be of interest.

Marketing a Beer and Ale Retail Business

How to Sell a Business

How Much Is My Business Worth?

Why Most Businesses Do Not Have Exit Plans


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