September 24, 2020  
 
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Selling a Company

 

Selling a Cardboard Business

Business sellers have diverse personal and professional goals for the sale of their companies. But no matter what you expect from the sale of your cardboard business, it's in your best interest to maximize the sales price through the application of proven sales techniques.

The business-for-sale market is just as frustrating for buyers as it is for sellers these days. Although there are plenty of entrepreneurs who want to buy a cardboard business, capital restrictions are holding them back.
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Too often cardboard business owners fail to receive fair market value for their businesses. With the right strategy, your sale doesn't have to end that way.

Seller Financing

The shortage in today's marketplace isn't interested buyers -- it's capital. Thanks to more stringent commercial lending requirements, sellers have become de facto lenders, providing the financing buyers need to get their feet in the door. As you prepare for the sale of your cardboard business, expect to be asked to finance a substantial part of the sale price.

What About Market Conditions?

No one plans to sell a cardboard business in a down economy. So far, government intervention and promises that the economy is slowly recovering haven't been enough to alleviate many entrepreneur's fears. But when the economy fully rebounds, a shadow inventory of cardboard businesses will flood the market and drive prices down even further. Like it or not, the time to sell your cardboard business may be right now, as long as your willing to adequately prepare your business for the marketplace.

How Much Does It Cost to Sell a cardboard business?

In a cardboard business sale, pricing is based on a number of factors, including the costs incurred during the sale. Although they can significantly increase the final sale price, brokers typically receive a 10% commission. Attorneys, accountants and appraisers work for a flat fee that can range from hundreds to thousands of dollars. If you need to compensate employees to assist with the sale, their services should also be considered.

More Info on Business Transitions and Related Articles

Given your interest in exit planning and in cardboard businesses, you might find these additional resources to be of interest.

Marketing a Cardboard Business

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