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Selling a Corporate Finance and Securities Attorneys Business

It's a misconception that no one is buying corporate finance and securities attorneys businesses these days. Savvy entrepreneurs see corporate finance and securities attorneys business opportunities as a path to short-term profits and long-term growth. There aren't any guarantees, but if you adhere to fundamental business sale concepts, you can likely get a good price for your business.

The business-for-sale market is just as frustrating for buyers as it is for sellers these days. Capital is scarce and many buyers simply can't afford the entry requirements for a corporate finance and securities attorneys business.

Most corporate finance and securities attorneys businesses are good business opportunities, a fact that is not going unnoticed by today's discerning buyers.

Laying the Groundwork

A successful corporate finance and securities attorneys business sale begins with careful planning. Although you are convinced your business has value in the marketplace, the planning process establishes a framework for communicating its value to prospective buyers. In our experience, it pays to solicit the advice of a professional business broker as soon as possible. A good broker will guide you through the preparation stage and make sure you've covered all the bases. Specifically, brokers can advise you about the preparation of financial statements and other documents buyers expect to see in a premium corporate finance and securities attorneys business opportunity.

Selling to a Family Member

The idea of passing a business along to a family member sounds idyllic to many business owners. in reality, a family-based corporate finance and securities attorneys business sale can be more complicated than selling to a stranger. In fact, selling your corporate finance and securities attorneys business to a family member can quickly become a no-win proposition. If you refuse to discount the sales price or offer other concessions, it could create a rift with the buyer. But if you give in to the buyer's demands, you risk alienating family members who may feel the buyer is receiving an early inheritance. If possible, discuss a long-term, generational transition with the entire family and seek the advice of a professional consultant.

Signs You're in Over Your Head

Many corporate finance and securities attorneys business are tempted to save brokerage fees by selling their businesses on their own. Although there are exceptions, solo sales typically take longer and are less productive than brokered sales. As a rule, no business should sit on the market for more than six months without attracting the interest of at least a handful of qualified buyers. When buyers fail to exhibit substantive interest, it could indicate unrealistic pricing or an inferior selling strategy. Hire a broker and conduct a professional appraisal ASAP.

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