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Selling a Flocking Business

Selling a flocking business doesn't happen overnight. It takes a deliberate process to get top dollar for your company.

Business-for-sale markets are less dependent on economic conditions than most sellers think they are.

But at Gaebler, we see flocking businesses still selling at a brisk pace. Not surprisingly, buyers expect to receive value for their dollars - and that means sellers need to demonstrate that their businesses are capable of delivering anticipated returns.

Average Timeframes

Hoping for a quick flocking business sale? You may be disappointed. Although asking price and other factors contribute to sale time, it's difficult to predict how long your business will be on the market before you locate the right buyer. Before you can list your flocking business, you'll need to invest as much as a year in preparing it for prospective buyers. In a good market, an attractive flocking business can sell in as little as a few months, although it can take more than a year to find the right buyer after the business is listed.

Signs You're in Over Your Head

The flocking business-for-sale marketplace is a mixed bag of brokered sales and solo efforts. But for every successful unassisted sale, several other flocking businesses sell below market value or languish on the market for years without attracting the interest of qualified buyers. As a rule, no business should sit on the market for more than six months without attracting the interest of at least a handful of qualified buyers. Lack of buyer enthusiasm or persistence indicates that something is wrong. The remedy is professional brokerage or a consultation with more experienced sellers.

Finding Flocking Business Buyers

It's difficult to predict where the buyer of your flocking business will come from. So you'll need to take a diverse approach to identifying prospective buyers. Although it's helpful to target promotional tactics to likely buyers, allow for some exposure to the broader market. Networking is another useful tool in locating buyers. It might surprise you to learn how many flocking business buyers emerge from conversations with peer groups, vendors, and business associations. In some cases, leads obtained through networking are preferred because they come with personal recommendations.

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