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Selling a Labeling Equipment and Supplies Business

Owning a labeling equipment and supplies business hasn't always been a bed of roses, but it's been worth the effort. The next step is to position your business for the demands of the business-for-sale marketplace.

When it comes to selling a labeling equipment and supplies business, there are no shortcuts to success.

A business sale is always a sophisticated transaction and if you aren't prepared for it, your labeling equipment and supplies business sale could have an unexpected outcome. To stay on course, you'll need sound strategy and meticulous execution on your side.

Before You Sell

There is a lot of work that needs to be done before you're ready to sell your labeling equipment and supplies business. The first item on your checklist should be a reality check -- if you plan to sell your business for top dollar in just a few short months, you need to adjust your expectations%However, your first priority should be to set realistic expectations for the selling process and its eventual outcome. Armed with a realistic timeframe and asking price, you can begin to consult with your broker about the best way to approach likely buyers.

Buyer Concessions

Sellers aren't the only ones who can make concessions in a business sale. In many instances, sellers can request buyer concessions. Although this scenario frequently plays out around seller financed deals, it's possible to push for a higher sales price or other form of compensation if you agree to mentor the buyer for a specified period of time. Like seller concessions, buyer concessions should be addressed during negotiations, before the preparation of a Letter of Intent.

Signs You're in Over Your Head

Many labeling equipment and supplies business are tempted to save brokerage fees by selling their businesses on their own. Although there are exceptions, solo sales typically take longer and are less productive than brokered sales. As a rule, no business should sit on the market for more than six months without attracting the interest of at least a handful of qualified buyers. Lack of buyer enthusiasm or persistence indicates that something is wrong. The remedy is professional brokerage or a consultation with more experienced sellers.

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