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Business Exit Planning

Selling a Movie Theaters and Showtimes Business

Market perceptions play a role in your ability to sell a movie theaters and showtimes business. Yet great values are always received well in the business-for-sale marketplace. All it takes is a strategy to identify solid prospects and convert them to buyers.

Business-for-sale markets are less dependent on economic conditions than most sellers think they are.

Qualified buyers are constantly looking for attractive movie theaters and showtimes businesses. Not surprisingly, buyers expect to receive value for their dollars - and that means sellers need to demonstrate that their businesses are capable of delivering anticipated returns.

Signs You're in Over Your Head

Many movie theaters and showtimes business are tempted to save brokerage fees by selling their businesses on their own. Although there are exceptions, solo sales typically take longer and are less productive than brokered sales. As a rule, no business should sit on the market for more than six months without attracting the interest of at least a handful of qualified buyers. Lack of buyer enthusiasm or persistence indicates that something is wrong. The remedy is professional brokerage or a consultation with more experienced sellers.

Preparing Family Members

Many sellers embarked on their movie theaters and showtimes business sale without adequately considering the impact it will have on their families. Unfortunately, families often experience turmoil during a sale even when the primary owner is convinced it's the right decision. The sale of the business will likely result in new family dynamics. Subsequently, selling a movie theaters and showtimes business has to include ample communication and shared decision-making.

Selling a Movie Theaters & Showtimes Business to an Employee

Employee sales have pros and cons. A faithful employee may have the motivation and ability to continue to operate the business. If you need to sell quickly, the timeframe is condensed in an employee sale because you don't need to track down a buyer. Yet most employees lack the means to buy their employer's business at or near the asking price. Seller financing is one way to get around the capital deficit of an employee-based movie theaters and showtimes business sale, as long as you are willing to vet the employee's credit worthiness the same as any other buyer.

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