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Selling a Seed and Grain Cleaning Business

In any market, there are sellers and then there are serious sellers. We'll give you the tools you need to be taken seriously when you decide to sell your seed and grain cleaning business.

Selling a seed and grain cleaning business? You'll need to be prepared to address a variety of challenges that are common in the business-for-sale marketplace.

Eventually, it will the time will come to exit your business. When that happens, your future plans will be dependent on your ability to receive the highest possible sale price for your seed and grain cleaning business.

Advertising Your Sale

Profitable seed and grain cleaning business sales incorporate comprehensive advertising plans. However, confidentiality and other concerns can present challenges, even for sales professionals. The knowledge that your business is being sold almost always converts into negative PR with your customers and vendors. Business brokers are skilled at publicizing seed and grain cleaning business sales while maintaining the confidentiality that is critical to your business.

Advantages of Hiring a Broker

A good broker can offer several benefits to business sellers. Right out of the gate, brokers know how to help their clients properly prepare their businesses for a sale. More importantly, brokers have the ability to identify serious buyers and maintain confidentiality throughout the sale process. Typical brokerage rates (a.k.a. success fees) run 10% of the final price - an expense that is usually recouped through a higher sales price and less time on the market.

When to End Negotiations

If the devil is in the details, the negotiation stage of a seed and grain cleaning business sale is the devil's playground. But sooner or later, someone needs to bring negotiations to a close. Unfortunately, that responsibility often falls on the seller. It's not unusual for a seed and grain cleaning business sale negotiation to reach an impasse over price or other concessions. At this point in the process, an awareness of negotiation parameters really pays off. If the buyer is unwilling to accept your minimum demands, it's time to end negotiations and move on to the next prospect.

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