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Selling a Shoe Stores Equipment and Supplies Business

A lot can go wrong during the sale of a shoe stores equipment and supplies business these days. With little room for error, your business sale has to feature the flawless execution of concepts that are driving today's business-for-sale marketplace.

The shoe stores equipment and supplies business-for-sale marketplace is a nuanced environment, full of pitfalls for sellers who aren't prepared for its demands.

There is no simple way to sell a business. But the most prepared shoe stores equipment and supplies business sellers are achieving fair market value and more for their companies through persistence and the application of sound selling techniques.

Sweetening the Deal

Today's shoe stores equipment and supplies business buyers expect sellers to offer concessions to persuade them to close the deal. Concessions can consist of non-cash as well as cash incentives. In fact, many concessions have little or no financial impact, but go a long way toward making the deal more palatable to young entrepreneurs. A limited amount of training and mentoring may seem inconsequential to you, but to a young shoe stores equipment and supplies business owner, they can be critical launching points for their ownership journey.

How to Work with Business Brokers

Brokerage is a mainstay of the business-for-sale marketplace. Brokerage is particularly common in the shoe stores equipment and supplies business-for-sale market, where aggressive selling strategies are the norm. Brokerage doesn't replace the seller's requirement to be involved in the sale; it augments the seller's efforts and creates a more seamless sale process. Successfully brokered sales are based on solid relationships between brokers and sellers as well as the strict execution of a common selling strategy.

Average Preparation Time

There are no effective shortcuts for selling a shoe stores equipment and supplies business. Since buyers prefer to see evidence of future cash flow, you'll want to to strategically lock in cash flows and increase profits before you list the business. Next, the business will need to be documented in professional financial statements and manuals that facilitate the ownership transition. Since all of this takes time and effort, a shoe stores equipment and supplies business can rarely be ready for the marketplace in less than six months. If you can afford to wait, we recommend investing a few years in improving your business's financial position before you put it on the market.

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