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Selling a Social Settlements Business

When it's time to sell your social settlements business, your future plans depend on your ability to get the highest possible sales price. Here's how to do it . . .

With planning and patience, most social settlements businesses can be sold for a fair price in the current business-for-sale marketplace.

Too often social settlements business owners fail to receive fair market value for their businesses. Smart sellers know the value of their companies are prepared to identify buyers who are willing to pay top dollar.

Signs You're in Over Your Head

Many social settlements business are tempted to save brokerage fees by selling their businesses on their own. Without brokerage, the risk of your sale going off-course is increased. As a rule, no business should sit on the market for more than six months without attracting the interest of at least a handful of qualified buyers. When buyers fail to exhibit substantive interest, it could indicate unrealistic pricing or an inferior selling strategy. If that occurs, it's time to bring in the professionals to get your sale back on track.

Current Market Conditions

Today's social settlements business sellers face an intimidating economic landscape. So far, government intervention and promises that the economy is slowly recovering haven't been enough to alleviate many entrepreneur's fears. However, many business sellers don't realize that a full economic rebound can have devastating consequences, particularly if sellers who have waited to list their businesses suddenly create a glut in the business-for-sale marketplace. Like it or not, the time to sell your social settlements business may be right now, as long as your willing to adequately prepare your business for the marketplace.

Sweetening the Deal

Today's social settlements business buyers expect sellers to offer concessions to persuade them to close the deal. Concessions can consist of non-cash as well as cash incentives. When you've reached your limit on price, consider offering non-cash concessions to encourage a commitment from the buyer. A limited amount of training and mentoring may seem inconsequential to you, but to a young social settlements business owner, they can be critical launching points for their ownership journey.

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