Resources for Entrepreneurs

Sell a Business Tips

Selling a Stained and Leaded Glass Commercial and Industrial Business

Economic uncertainty influences the timing of many stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business sales. But based on what we're seeing in the business-for-sale marketplace, we don't think economic conditions should deter you from putting your stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business on the market.

In a down economy, many stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business sellers wait to list their businesses until they see signs that the economy has rebounded, making it difficult to accurately evaluate the number of stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial businesses that are actually for sale.

But sooner or later, all good things must come to an end. As a consequence, you have a substantial stake in knowing how to receive maximum price for your stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business.

Emotional Considerations

It's impossible to predict the emotional highs and lows you will experience during the sale of your stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business. Given your personal investment, you may also experience disappointment in the market's assessment of your company's value. You can prepare yourself by talking through your emotions with friends and family members, and thoroughly evaluating your minimum requirements before you put your stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business on the market.

Sale Costs

In a stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business sale, pricing is based on a number of factors, including the costs incurred during the sale. Hiring a broker is a mixed bag because although brokers can increase the sale price, they also take a 10% fee. Professional consultations can also represent a significant expense during the course of a stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business sale. Furthermore, your time has value, so you may need to include a personal compensation consideration in your expense estimates.

Why Confidentiality Matters

Highly publicized stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business sales are risky stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial businesssales. A low-key selling strategy is a low risk activity because you can control who does (and doesn't) know that your business is on the market. Eventually, word will leak out. When that happens, it can damage your standing with customers and vendors. Maintaining confidentiality isn't easy, but without it you won't get top dollar for your business. In a worse case scenario, a profitable stained and leaded glass commercial and industrial business can be reduced to one that is struggling to survive. Brokers and consultants can mitigate the risk by implementing confidential sale techniques.

Have Friends Who Might Like This Article?

Tweet via @gaeblerdotcom Share this on Twitter

Let them know on LinkedIn

Ready to Learn More? We Think You Might Like These Articles:


Additional Resources for Entrepreneurs

Lists of Venture Capital and Private Equity Firms

Franchise Opportunities

Contributors

Business Glossary