Resources for Entrepreneurs

Sell a Business Tips

Selling a Stretch and Shrink Film Business

Business sellers have diverse personal and professional goals for the sale of their companies. But no matter what you expect from the sale of your stretch and shrink film business, it's in your best interest to maximize the sales price through the application of proven sales techniques.

You've invested too much in your stretch and shrink film business to let it be sold for less than its worth. But unless you adequately prepare for the sale, some lucky buyer may walk away with a huge discount.

Fortunately for sellers, forward-thinking entrepreneurs continue to be attracted to stretch and shrink film businesses that exhibit strong financials and potential for future growth.

How to Skillfully Address Buyer Concerns

Buyers can present challenges, especially during the due diligence stage. The questions stretch and shrink film business ask during due diligence are designed to alleviate their concerns about the business and should be promptly addressed by the seller. Avoid answering buyer concerns with vague generalities. Instead, be as specific as possible, even if it means doing additional research before offering a response. If due diligence drags on too long, your broker may need to intervene.

Sale Documents

A basic understanding of legal requirements is foundational for a successful business sale. Despite the confusion that exists among many sellers, the essentials of the sale are described in the Letter of Intent, a seminal document that is created prior to due diligence . If you are seeking buyer concessions, the time to address them is before the Letter of Intent is drafted. For sellers, that makes a close review of the Letter of Intent more than a formality - it's a critical juncture on the path to closing.

Pre-Sale Checklist

The upfront time you investment in the sale of your stretch and shrink film business will pay big dividends at closing. Perhaps the most important pre-sale consideration is to right-size your expectations to the realities of the market. Once your expectations are in the ballpark, you can move on to making your business presentable to prospective buyers.

Have Friends Who Might Like This Article?

Tweet via @gaeblerdotcom Share this on Twitter

Let them know on LinkedIn

Ready to Learn More? We Think You Might Like These Articles:


Additional Resources for Entrepreneurs

Lists of Venture Capital and Private Equity Firms

Franchise Opportunities

Contributors

Business Glossary