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Selling a Surety and Fidelity Bonds Business

Most businesses are susceptible to economic conditions and surety and fidelity bonds businesses are no exception. But in some cases, a down economy can actually improve saleability. To increase your company's sale price, you'll need to perform adequate preparations, positioning it to the catch the eye of profit-minded buyers.

The business-for-sale market is just as frustrating for buyers as it is for sellers these days. Although there are plenty of entrepreneurs who want to buy a surety and fidelity bonds business, capital restrictions are holding them back.

There is no simple way to sell a business. But the most prepared surety and fidelity bonds business sellers are achieving fair market value and more for their companies through persistence and the application of sound selling techniques.

Economic Considerations

When you sell a surety and fidelity bonds business, there are a number of variables you need to consider. Interest rates, spending, inflation, and other variables directly influence how long your surety and fidelity bonds business will be on the market as well as its sales price. The truth is that perfect market conditions may never materialize. A much better approach is to focus on the factors that always attract buyers and investors. In our experience, the most important factors in the sale of a surety and fidelity bonds business have little to do with the economy.

Professional Appraisals

An experienced appraiser is part and parcel of a successful surety and fidelity bonds business sale. By hiring an appraiser to conduct a thorough appraisal of tangible and non-tangible assets prior to listing, you get a measure of the true worth of your business. Although the appraised value of your business may not be the same as the sales price, you gain valuable insight that can be used to your advantage during negotiations. If you're disappointed with the appraiser's estimate of your company's worth, you have the option of seeking a second opinion. However, it's more often the case that you will need to adjust your expectations of your business's value to buyers.

Pros & Cons of a Sale to an Employee

Although it may seem easier to sell your surety and fidelity bonds business to an employee, this approach also has some pitfalls. A faithful employee may have the motivation and ability to continue to operate the business. Since the worker already knows the ins and outs of the business, due diligence should be a breeze, not to mention the fact that you won't have to wait months or years for the right buyer to emerge on the open marketplace. However, some employees feel they are entitled to special treatment and pricing, especially if they have played a key role in the company's success. Most of the time, employees also expect owners to finance a large portion of the sale. So if you aren't willing to finance the sale or need to get top dollar for your surety and fidelity bonds business, a sale to an employee is probably not a possibility.

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