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Selling a Surgery Veterinarians Business

You've invested time, effort, and creativity into building your surgery veterinarians business. Now it's time to put that same kind of focus into selling it.

Business sellers sometimes face a long, hard struggle to get fair market value for their companies. But with the adequate preparation, your surgery veterinarians business can attract buyers who recognize its potential.

But sooner or later, all good things must come to an end. As a consequence, you have a substantial stake in knowing how to receive maximum price for your surgery veterinarians business.

Sale Preparations for Your Surgery Veterinarians Business

First-time business sellers sometimes don't realize that the success or failure of their sale is determined before it hits the market. Profitable surgery veterinarians business sales begin with a comprehensive strategy that incorporates planning, preparation and market positioning. Everything you do to increase market share and profitability has a payoff in the final sale price of your surgery veterinarians business. But your efforts to improve your company's position and profitability will only be effective if you invest similar effort into the preparation of accurate financial statements for buyers.

Advantages of Hiring a Broker

A good broker can offer several benefits to business sellers. Right out of the gate, brokers know how to help their clients properly prepare their businesses for a sale. More importantly, brokers have the ability to identify serious buyers and maintain confidentiality throughout the sale process. Typical brokerage rates (a.k.a. success fees) run 10% of the final price - an expense that is usually recouped through a higher sales price and less time on the market.

Negotiation Exit Strategy

Negotiations have a way of dragging on forever. Yet eventually many negotiations reach a stage where further discussion is pointless. In a surgery veterinarians business sale, a stalled negotiation can be an indication that the deal is dead. At this point in the process, an awareness of negotiation parameters really pays off. If the buyer is unwilling to accept your minimum demands, it's time to end negotiations and move on to the next prospect.

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