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Selling a Swap Shops and Meets Business

For the right sellers, the business-for-sale marketplace is a friendly environment for swap shops and meets business opportunities. There aren't any guarantees, but if you adhere to fundamental business sale concepts, you can likely get a good price for your business.

You survived all the ups and downs of owning a business. Next, you'll need to prepare yourself to address the rigors of selling a swap shops and meets business.

You'll always have an excuse for not putting your business on the market. Any swap shops and meets business can be sold at any time -- you just need to know how to influence the right buyers.

When the Sale Goes Off-Course

Many swap shops and meets business are tempted to save brokerage fees by selling their businesses on their own. Although there are exceptions, solo sales typically take longer and are less productive than brokered sales. As a rule, no business should sit on the market for more than six months without attracting the interest of at least a handful of qualified buyers. Lack of buyer enthusiasm or persistence indicates that something is wrong. The remedy is professional brokerage or a consultation with more experienced sellers.

Setting the Stage

Effective swap shops and meets business preparation focuses on communicating value to prospective buyers. Professional business brokers understand buyers and know how to properly communicate a swap shops and meets business to the marketplace. At a minimum, you'll want to position your business to receive the highest possible sale price, prepare a packet for prospective buyers and perform an initial appraisal before you put your swap shops and meets business on the market.

Selling a Swap Shops & Meets Business to an Employee

Employee sales have pros and cons. A faithful employee may have the motivation and ability to continue to operate the business. If you need to sell quickly, the timeframe is condensed in an employee sale because you don't need to track down a buyer. Yet most employees lack the means to buy their employer's business at or near the asking price. Most of the time, employees also expect owners to finance a large portion of the sale. So if you aren't willing to finance the sale or need to get top dollar for your swap shops and meets business, a sale to an employee is probably not a possibility.

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