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Selling a Tank Linings and Coatings Business

Most businesses are susceptible to economic conditions and tank linings and coatings businesses are no exception. But in some cases, a down economy can actually improve saleability. All it takes is a strategy to identify solid prospects and convert them to buyers.

Like it or not, a tank linings and coatings business sale is a complicated affair, made even more difficult by the emotions associated with leaving a business you've poured your life into. In our experience, a common owner concern is how the sale will affect customers and employees.

You'll always have an excuse for not putting your business on the market. Selling a tank linings and coatings business isn't easy, but we believe sellers can achieve their goals in any economic environment.

Dealing with Your Emotions

Business sellers sometimes struggle to handle the emotions of a sale. You probably have good reasons for selling your tank linings and coatings business now, but that doesn't make the emotions you will experience any easier. Instead of feeling guilty about your emotions, take the time to process them with a mentor or friend. At the same time, it's helpful to consult with people who can help limit the influence of your emotions on negotiations and other aspects of the sale process.

How to Skillfully Address Buyer Concerns

Business sellers sometimes struggle to maintain a positive attitude when dealing with buyers. Due diligence preparation can mitigate the irritation factor, but you should still expect to field numerous buyer concerns before closing. To protect yourself, don't offer an answer until you are sure the information you are providing is 100% accurate. If due diligence drags on too long, your broker may need to intervene.

Sale Documents

We run into a lot of tank linings and coatings business sellers who intend to wait until the final contract to negotiate details. Big mistake. With few exceptions, sale structure is hammered out early, in the Letter of Intent . The price described in the Letter of Intent may fluctuate based on information that is revealed during due diligence, but the inclusion of new requirements in the final contract could be a deal killer. Never sign a Letter of Intent until it has been properly reviewed by your attorney and you are in complete agreement with everything it contains.

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