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Selling a Textile Brokers Business

For the right sellers, the business-for-sale marketplace is a friendly environment for textile brokers business opportunities. Here's what you need to know to get a fair price for your company.

Today's textile brokers business buyers tend to be more skeptical than most about the nation's economic outlook.

More than a few textile brokers business owners fail to receive fair market value for their businesses. Smart sellers know the value of their companies are prepared to identify buyers who are willing to pay top dollar.

Before You Sell

The pre-sale checklist for a textile brokers business is long and is full of critical tasks that will likely determine the success (or failure) of your sale. Perhaps the most important pre-sale consideration is to right-size your expectations to the realities of the market. After you have consulted with a business broker to right size your expectations, you'll need to add several items to your checklist, including financial statement preparation, pre-sale appraisals, financial planning, market positioning and other tasks designed to communicate value to prospective buyers.

Advantages of Hiring a Broker

A good broker can offer several benefits to business sellers. Right out of the gate, brokers know how to help their clients properly prepare their businesses for a sale. Second, a good business broker is a master at confidentiality locating textile brokers business sale prospects and guiding sellers through negotiations. Although you will pay a fee for brokerage, it's generally worth it because the end result will be a higher sales prices and more favorable terms.

Selling a Textile Brokers Business to an Employee

Employee sales have pros and cons. A faithful employee may have the motivation and ability to continue to operate the business. The time and expense of locating the right buyer will be nonexistent and you won't have to spend weeks showing the buyer every square inch of the company. Yet most employees lack the means to buy their employer's business at or near the asking price. Seller financing is one way to get around the capital deficit of an employee-based textile brokers business sale, as long as you are willing to vet the employee's credit worthiness the same as any other buyer.

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