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Niche Exit Planning Tactics

Selling a Word Processing Equipment and Supplies Business

The decision to sell your word processing equipment and supplies business isn't something that should be taken lightly, especially these days. If a business exit is on the horizon, you'll want to check out our suggestions for staying ahead of the market.

Business-for-sale markets are less dependent on economic conditions than most sellers think they are.

There is no simple way to sell a business. But the most prepared word processing equipment and supplies business sellers are achieving fair market value and more for their companies through persistence and the application of sound selling techniques.

Sweetening the Deal

Today's word processing equipment and supplies business buyers expect sellers to offer concessions to persuade them to close the deal. Concessions can consist of non-cash as well as cash incentives. It's not unusual for sellers to offer non-cash incentives to help inexperienced entrepreneurs get off to a successful start. A limited amount of training and mentoring may seem inconsequential to you, but to a young word processing equipment and supplies business owner, they can be critical launching points for their ownership journey.

What to Expect in a Word Processing Equipment & Supplies Business Sale

It's impossible to predict the emotional highs and lows you will experience during the sale of your word processing equipment and supplies business. Many sellers experience discouragement during a long sale process. You can prepare yourself by talking through your emotions with friends and family members, and thoroughly evaluating your minimum requirements before you put your word processing equipment and supplies business on the market.

Working with Appraisers

There is no substitute for a qualified appraisal in the sale of your word processing equipment and supplies business. Leading industry appraisers equip sellers with a value gauge that can be accessed during negotiations. If you're disappointed with the appraiser's estimate of your company's worth, you have the option of seeking a second opinion. However, it's more often the case that you will need to adjust your expectations of your business's value to buyers.

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