Resources for Entrepreneurs

Selling a Business Advice

Selling an Irrigation Consultants Business

Owning an irrigation consultants business hasn't always been a bed of roses, but it's been worth the effort. Now the trick is to convince cautious buyers that your operation is worth the asking price.

Personal and professional concerns surround the sale of an irrigation consultants business. In our experience, a common owner concern is how the sale will affect customers and employees.

Irrigation Consultants Business

Although it takes hard work and dedication, if it's time to exit your irrigation consultants business there is a good chance you can sell it for a good price -- even in today's market.

How to Identify Prospective Buyers

Many sellers don't realize how many prospective buyers there are for their businesses. We frequently see qualified buyers emerge from the seller's network of business and personal acquaintances. In other cases, sellers take a proactive approach to finding likely buyers and contacting them directly. Competitors may seem like natural prospects and they are. The downside is that they won't pay top dollar and will probably absorb your company into their own.

Hiring an Attorney

It's obvious that you're going to need to hire an attorney to finalize the sale of your irrigation consultants business. Competent legal counsel ensures that the sale documents are in proper order. Furthermore, a good lawyers provides the counsel necessary to navigate the tax and liability issues that surround a business sale. We recommend hiring an attorney early in the process to gain insights about the legal consequences of various sale outcomes.

Preparing Your Employees

As a business owner, you want to keep you employees informed about your plans; as a seller it's in your best interest to keep your employees in the dark for as long as possible. You're concerned about confidentiality, and rightfully so. However, the longer the selling process drags on, the more likely it is that rumors will begin to circulate throughout your workforce. Consider informing your key employees first, followed by the rest of your workforce later in the process. Maintain a positive tone in your conversations and answer your employees questions as completely as you can without jeopardizing the sale.

Have Friends Who Might Like This Article?

Tweet via @gaeblerdotcom Share this on Twitter

Let them know on LinkedIn

Ready to Learn More? We Think You Might Like These Articles:


Additional Resources for Entrepreneurs

Lists of Venture Capital and Private Equity Firms

Franchise Opportunities

Contributors

Business Glossary